Friday, January 18, 2008

Photo Studio - Light Tent

Earlier this week Nikki-Ann purchased a mini photo studio for taking pictures of some of her collectibles. She has a couple of nice examples of the results. The "studio" she mentions sells for about $80 here in the states.

We all have things we'd like to photograph but maybe the cost doesn't quite fit into your budget, can't be justified or perhaps you only have a few things to photograph. The alternative to buying a mini studio is to make one yourself!

Sure. Well, I found two versions of a photo studio/light box you can build yourself and both seem do-able. One is of a temporary nature and is created from a cardboard box while the other is more permanent and uses a frame constructed with PVC pipe. Both sites provide excellent directions. With a little ingenuity, I think these could even be used for taking pictures of photographs that can't be scanned, such as those pasted in albums that would be destroyed if scanned or those too large for the scanner. The light boxes should help eliminate hot spots usually caused by harsh, direct lighting.

I think I might give the cardboard box a try next week. A box, a little tape, and some tissue paper. What could be easier? We'll see.



The photos above show the studio that can be purchased, one that is made from a cardboard box, and one made with PVC pipe. The pictures were obtained from the following sites:

commercial site: http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=312182
from a box: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/07/how-to-diy-10-macro-photo-studio.html
from PVC pipe: http://www.pbase.com/wlhuber/light_box_light_tent

5 comments:

  1. The psychic hotline is at work again! I have been drooling over those expensive light boxes too, but couldn't justify it and was wondering if there wasn't a PVC answer of some kind. I love the sheet metal screws for holding the backdrop!

    I wouldn't glue the frame together - at least not all of it - so it could be easily taken apart and stored.

    Thanks for posting this great info!

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  2. I really should make one of these things. I could really use it. But the last thing I need right now is another project... read my lips, no new projects! LOL!

    Thanks for the info Becky. I'll definitely file it for for future reference.

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  3. It's a great idea to make one! It might be something for me to consider if I needed a bigger lightbox studio at some point. :)

    Have a great weekend!

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  4. Let us know how it works out for you. I'd never heard of one of these before Nikki-Ann wrote about it and already I can see all kinds of things it would be great to use with.

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  5. Becky, this is a GREAT way to digitize anything oversized, 3D or very fragile. Scrapbooks. LP records. The list goes on and on. I love the fact that it's DIY. Woo hoo!

    One of my librarian buddies rigged up a document copystand using pvc pipes and two small under-cabinet florescent lights. It's a super efficient way to copy archival materials, but it only works if your digital camera has a remote control. Oh, and some repositories don't allow this kind of copying, so check first.

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